Ruth Singer exhibiting at London Craft Week

My Precious Objects collection will be part of Design Nation’s showcase Head, Hand and Heart during London Craft Week 9-12 May 2018.

I will be in the exhibition on Saturday 12th May to talk to visitors.

Helen Yardley Studio
3-5 Hardwidge Street, London, SE1 3SY

11am-6pm each day, and until 8pm on Thursday

Emotional Repair Exhibition Masterclass

I’ve got a one-day workshop alongside my exhibition at Gawthorpe Hall Textile Collection on Friday 18th May. There are only a handful of tickets left!

Make a Precious Objects sampler using vintage fabrics and tiny treasures. All materials are provided but you might want to bring your own pieces to personalise your work.

You might also be interested in the Makers in Museums symposium for makers and curators in June.

 

 

Criminal Quilts collaborative quilt

CLOSED!

Thanks for your interest but I’ve now had over 100 people register which already makes an enormous quilt!

I am hoping to re-open this later in the year for exhibitions in 2019, so please keep in touch by signing up to my mailing list, following this blog or my social media including Criminal Quilts Twitter

 

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Brief Encounters art-science exhibition

I’ve created some new science-inspired work for a small group exhibition which will be opening on Friday 9th March at Newarke Houses Museum, Leicester. This is part of the University of Leicester’s British Science Week celebrations. Find out more about the project and exhibition here. The exhibition continues until 31st March 2018. Some of the Petri Dish Project will also be shown in the exhibition.

My work is often around making ideas and concepts into visual form through textile and mixed media. My first career was working in museums, and this comes through now in my choice of exploring themes of memory, history and personal stories, usually taking historic objects or family history as my source. I was intrigued by the idea of telomeres, the ends of chromosomes having a role to play in ageing. This ties in with my previous work on genetics and other work around grieving, length of time expressed through linear pieces and of capturing ephemeral moments permanent through creating artworks.

Visiting Dr Nicola Royle and talking through the work she does sparked lots of ideas of how I might develop new work around length, ageing and repair. I wanted to explore some of the words and ideas which are used in genetics research and their resonance in the world outside the lab.

DNA is often referred to as strands, like hair or threads. I chose to work with this concept to create a new piece using long lengths of fine wool thread grouped and bound at intervals. Thinking about telomeres, the ends of chromosomes, gave me the inspiration to work with the ends of the thread, in this case knotted together in small groups.

I was also intrigued by the role telomeres play in DNA repair and chose to represent this through a textile repair. The microscopic imagery of chromosomes uses a bright pink fluorescence to highlight telomeres so I chose a similarly-coloured darning thread and used to repair a silk handkerchief.

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Talks and Events February and March 2018

I have a sudden flurry of talks, events, training and other activities coming up in the next few weeks, starting with a talk about my work at the lovely  Atelier Stroud on 24th February, 2.30pm. Details and booking here.

 

On Monday 26th February I am taking part in Process, part of DMU Cultural Exchanges programme with a workshop about my genetics residency project with Gillian McFarland and Professor Turi King. This is a FREE event at De Montfort University and will include the chance to extract DNA and make a creative petri dish.  Find out more and book here.

I’m sharing my project development and funding experience as well as launching a new Pain-Free Project Planning toolkit at Craftspace’s Made in the Middle Pathways to Making II Symposium on 9th March.

For Leicestershire artists and makers there’s a free workshop on funding your creative practice on Monday 12th March.

And later on Thurs 15th March 6-7pm I’ll be giving a FREE short talk about Criminal Quilts before a film show with Unseen Cinema (film has a charge, talk doesn’t).

 

I am also giving talks to students and graduates of De Montfort University, Loughborough University and Wolverhampton university in the next few weeks. I am always happy to talk to university course leaders and enterprise teams about delivering professional development sessions.

Criminal Quilts : Creative Residency

Alongside my research and workshops at Staffordshire Record Office, my Criminal Quilts project also includes a creative residency in the Fashion and Textile Department of Wolverhampton University. I included this in the project so I could work with students and staff to help develop the creative work and have access to their amazing studio facilities. I am in the process of setting up a student brief for students across art and design to make work for exhibitions based around the information and data which is growing from the archive research.  I hope that working alongside a practicing artist on a live project with exhibitions and publications will be a great experience and some exciting and innovative work will be produced.

Personally I am working closely with Senior Lecturer Jan Wrigley and Professor Fiona Hackney on both the practical, creative side and on completely new (for me) outcomes for the project including a symposium at the end of 2018 and academic papers. When I devised the project plan and funding application I intentionally created new ways of sharing the project beyond the usual exhibition and am excited by the possibilities which have developed to share and record the project in so many ways.

I also get the chance to experiment with the equipment and facilities at the University including digital print and tufting, all of which is completely new to me. The screen print workshop has much larger capacity than I am used to as well so I hope that I will be able to make some larger scale work rather than my usual tiny, detailed hand stitched work. I even got to have a go with the embellisher in the machine room on my last visit and hope to use the Cornelly embroidery machine on another session.  I was also charmed to find pages from my books adorning the machine room for student reference!

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Emotional Repair Exhibition

I am currently working on a new exhibition at Gawthorpe Hall Textile Collection which is in an amazing National Trust building in Lancashire. The textiles there are a private collection assembled by Rachel Kay Shuttleworth (1886- 1967) who lived in the house and opened it up to share her collections and her knowledge.

 

I first visited the Gawthorpe in 2015 to look at their pincushion collection  as inspiration for Memorial Pincushions,  which celebrate the life of my beloved aunt. The first half of collection were included in my Narrative Threads exhibition in 2015  and some in Salisbury Textiles Open in 2016. Emotional Repair will be the first time all 46 (each one representing a year of her life) will be displayed together and alongside the original inspiration pieces from Miss Rachel’s own collection.

 

Late in 2016 I began talking to Jenny Waterson, curator of contemporary exhibitions and learning at Gawthorpe Textile Collection about showing this piece and others in a solo exhibition which is now confirmed for 28 March – 24 June 2018. Over the last year I have been developing new pieces of work and groups which will form this exhibition. I also returned to Gawthorpe in the autumn to look at more textiles, this time selecting pieces about mourning and remembrance, as well as unfinished pieces which I consider very poignant and full of potential stories of loss.

Emotional Repair covers a wide range of personal and emotive subjects focused around loss and remembering and includes work made over the last two years as well as brand new pieces currently in development.  Much of this work is deeply personal and touches on subjects which are hard to talk about so it may seem strange that I want to share them in this very public way, but we all know just how healing and cathartic it can be to make things when having a tough time. Textiles have such strong associations with domesticity, personal lives and family memory that they are the perfect means to express emotional stories. For me this works so well with the Gawthorpe Textile Collection, although Miss Rachel didn’t collect with this emotional response in mind, it is still one woman’s personal selection and it is displayed and preserved in her family home which brings an intimacy and personality beyond most museum collections.

The exhibition opens 28th March and continues until 24th June 2018.