Criminal Quilts Exhibitions

 Exhibitions

Criminal Quilts brings together archive research and contemporary textiles inspired by the stories of women photographed in Stafford Prison 1877-1916. It has been created by Ruth Singer with volunteers and project partners.

Wolverhampton University 2 November 2018 – 18 January 2019

This version of the exhibition will focus on the research behind the project and the work created by Ruth using the University facilities and support of the staff.

This exhibition will be accompanied by a symposium aiming to bring heritage, criminology, fashion history and art together, developed by Professor Fiona Hackney  – on 18th January 2019.

 Ruth will be giving a free talk on Wednesday 21st November at 5pm in the exhibition.

Exhibition entry is free, open 8.30 – 5pm Monday to Friday.

Closed Mon 24th Dec – Tues 1st January inclusive.

Also open Saturday 17th November 10am-4pm.

Exhibition talk and tour with the artist Wednesday 21st November, 5 – 6.30pm.

Millennium City Building (MC), City Campus (Wulfruna), Wulfruna Street, Wolverhampton, WV1 1LY. This building is a few minutes walk from the railway station.

The exhibition includes the specially-commissioned Criminal Quilts film showing archive research and making processes.

All exhibitions will also include the historical research display called Criminal Herstories which focusses on the archive photographs and documents, and what we have discovered about them. Find out more about Criminal Herstories display venues in summer 2018 and later in 2019 here.

2019 onwards

Venues in discussion for 2019 include Tyne and Wear, Nottingham, Yorkshire and confirmed at Brampton Museum, Newcastle-under-Lyme May – July 2019.

This exhibition is available for touring and has been designed to be highly flexible to suit different kinds of venues including white-wall art galleries, community spaces, corridor displays. It can also include Criminal Herstories historical display.  Please contact Ruth Singer to discuss possibilities for your venue.

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